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You’ve come to the right place if you want to be in the know about what’s going on in our organization. Be sure to check back regularly to get our latest news updates.

Recent studies have shown how volunteering with people or a cause you care about can actually mitigate depression and anxiety issues. Here's how.

The Beak of the Week on the Houston Audubon Facebook page featured the Ruddy Turnstone. It was posted by Bryce Loschen on January 18, 2019. Click the link to see the profile in our Bird Gallery.

We kicked off our inaugural Young Professionals Advisory Council (YPAC) this year. The first meeting was a social gathering at Axelrad on Thursday, January 17, 2019. The YPAC is an initiative to engage a new generation of bird and nature lovers in conservation. In addition to contributing their time and insight, the YPAC will also work together to complete a conservation, education or advocacy project in line with Houston Audubon’s mission.

Our newest bird cam is live on the Bolivar Flats. The camera shows a lagoon that is enclosed by marsh with channels of water. Wonderful flocks of birds can be seen in various places. Viewers can point the camera and zoom in to see exciting bird activity.

The Beak of the Week on the Houston Audubon Facebook page featured the Merlin. It was posted by Maria Hart on January 11, 2019. Click the link to see the profile in our Bird Gallery.

Get ready for our annual team-birding event. Dates for the 2019 competition have been announced. The logo has been updated to reflect our 50th anniversary year. Can you identify the change?

The Beak of the Week on the Houston Audubon Facebook page featured the Eared Grebe. It was posted by Bryce Loschen on January 4, 2019. Click the link to see the profile in our Bird Gallery

Hear the commotion of thousands of birds on Texas's Bolivar Peninsula. Thanks to BirdNote and National Audubon Society for this 1.5 minute audio story about the birds currently visiting our Bolivar Flats Shorebird Sanctuary.

Dawn Monachino, Education Specialist, gave a program for pre-K children on owls at our next door neighbor in west Houston, the Memorial Drive United Methodist Church. She brought Percy, Tskili, and Juliet. Kids had fun meeting them up close and singing an owl song. We had them pretend to be owls at the end to demonstrate silent flight.

Our logo has been decorated to celebrate 2019 as Houston Audubon's 50th anniversary.

Here is a link to the January 2019 edition of our monthly E-News in case you missed it. You can subscribe by filling in the form at the bottom of any page on our website.

Linda Royce portrays Edith L. Moore in a video filmed on October 27, 2018, during a Saturday's in Nature event. The event was part of the Houston History Alliance Women's History Program.

The video is staged in the living room of the historic log house (it is officially classified as a house, not a cabin) at a time after the Great Flood of 1935. Linda does a great job of speaking like Edith, who was born and raised in Minnesota. She covers a lot in this 9-minute video, spanning Edith's early life and education up north. She moved to Houston and worked at Camp Logan during World War I. After getting married, she and her husband Jesse moved to what is now the nature sanctuary. The talk contains many nostalgic stories about living off the land west of Houston.

You can read more about the history of Edith L. Moore and the log house on the website.

The Beak of the Week on the Houston Audubon Facebook page featured the Black Scoter. It was posted by Lark Heston on December 21, 2018. Click the link to see the profile in our Bird Gallery.

This page contains photos and links to help you understand the Coastal Spine project and concerns expressed by the environmental community.

Houston Audubon is committed to protecting its coastal sanctuaries, and we believe any major infrastructure project along the coast must incorporate a thorough study of ecological impact.

We have prepared a statement for the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers in response to its Coastal Study for a barrier system that runs 70 miles along the Upper Texas Coast, sometimes referred to as the Coastal Spine or Ike Dike. We invite you to stay informed by reading the these documents.

The hard-working volunteers of the Audubon Docent Guild met on the crisp evening of Sunday, December 16, 2018, to celebrate their many accomplishments of the past year at the annual holiday gathering. There was good food and good cheer. Guild President Sheryl Marquez and Docent Coordinator Bethany Foshée made a presentation about sanctuary changes including the recent effort to spread leaf litter on the grounds to replace the ground cover lost during Hurricane Harvey.

New t-shirts were distributed featuring a possum. This shows that Edith L. Moore is a "nature" sanctuary for critters in addition to birds.

Click the link to see a photo gallery of people that enjoyed the party.

Calling all Central Houston backyard birders! We are looking for feeder watchers for the Central Houston Christmas Bird Count (see count area below). If you have a feeder in outlined area and are interested in participating, please email avallery@houstonaudubon.org.

Click the link to get more information about Christmas Bird Counts around Houston (and all of Texas).

The Beak of the Week on the Houston Audubon Facebook page featured the Ruby-crowned Kinglet. It was posted by Maria Hart on December 14, 2018. Click the link to see the profile in our Bird Gallery.

This article was taken from the Bing search engine home page on December 14, 2018.

Before the 20th century, some North Americans organized ‘Christmas side hunts’ in which participants would choose sides, then compete to bag as many birds as possible. In 1900, ornithologist Frank Chapman suggested a bird census instead, and the Christmas Bird Count (CBC) was born. The annual count is sponsored by the National Audubon Society. This year, the CBC runs from today through January 5, 2019, giving citizen scientists across North America time to join in, get outside, and spot some birds. The data collected is used to gauge the health of various bird populations–this information is then used to focus conservation efforts on particular species and geographical areas.

If you have a chance to count northern cardinals in your area, like the one in our photo today, you can tell the females from the males easily: Only the males have the bright red feathers all over. The females have only splashes of red on their tan coats.

Our 2019 High Island patch features a Yellow-throated Warbler - very fitting for our 50th anniversary as it's also the bird in our logo.

Houston Audubon chose the Yellow-throated Warbler to represent the organization in logo form along with a mayfly and Spanish moss. These species were threatened by major development at Wallisville Lake and the work of Houston Audubon and others resulted in much of the area being conserved. As we celebrate the 50th anniversary of Houston Audubon, we acknowledge the courage and resolve of our first members to stand up for nature.

Patch art generously donated by Linda Feltner.

Houston Audubon comments on the Coastal Texas Study and an additional statement from a group of 15 conservation organizations.

We have been gathering bags of leaf litter at Edith L. Moore Nature Sanctuary. We are using these to rebuild the forest floor leaf litter layer, which was washed away during Harvey. This will help bring back our invertebrate and herp communities. The photos show the Tuesday Trail Crew hard at work spreading the leaves.

The City of Houston, under Kelli Ondracek’s leadership as Natural Resources Manager, is applying to be a Bird City. Bird City Texas is a new program offered by Texas Parks and Wildlife and Audubon Texas. The program outlines a rigorous set of criteria incorporating three key areas: habitat enhancement and protection, community engagement, and safer spaces for birds. Because of Houston’s important location for birds and because of the widespread activities of many partners in these three areas, our application shows significant current impact and success. We have also identified areas for improvement that will require broad alignment and effort including outdoor cats, city plant lists, and the lights out initiative. We also believe that biodiverse, green infrastructure needs to be a key part of the City’s resilience and sustainability plans.

The Bird Buddies had a special guest this Friday, December 7, 2018. They were learning all about the Laysan Albatross for L day and Anna Vallery, who works in the conservation department at Houston Audubon, spent 6 months living on Midway Island learning all about them. She came and gave a great presentation. The buddies loved learning all about how the scientists band the birds and they loved Dawn's song so much we sang and danced twice! Huge thanks to Anna!

The Beak of the Week on the Houston Audubon Facebook page featured the Sanderling. It was posted by Bryce Loschen on December 7, 2018. Click the link to see the profile in our Bird Gallery.

We cleared the fence line at Hooks Woods, thinned some of the Cherry Laurel, weeded several hundred potted prairie plants, and installed several nesting platforms on the island in Smith Pond. Click the link to read more.

Houston Audubon will have its 50th birthday on September 26, 2019. The staff and volunteers held a meeting on November 29, 2018, to begin planning for a year of events to celebrate the anniversary. There are many things coming and everyone can get involved starting in January, 2019. Everything will be featured on the website and on our social media channels.

The Beak of the Week on the Houston Audubon Facebook page featured the Blue-gray Gnatcatcher. It was posted by Lark Heston on November 30, 2018. Click the link to see the profile in our Bird Gallery.

Here is a link to the December 2018 edition of our monthly E-News in case you missed it. You can subscribe by filling in the form at the bottom of any page on our website.

Over the past couple of weeks, we've introduced Tskili and Simon, two of our education ambassadors. Here's their story.

You can meet Simon and Tskili, after he’s fully recovered, at the Houston Audubon Raptor and Education Center, opening in 2019.

Member field trip report for Saturday, November 24, 2018.

Here is a link to the photo album.

The Beak of the Week on the Houston Audubon Facebook page featured the Red-breasted Merganser. It was posted by Richard Gibbons and Maria Hart on November 23, 2018. Click the link to see the profile in our Bird Gallery.

Meet Simon, a 3 year old owl from Wyoming. Although Simon was originally thought to be male, it became clear when she arrived in Houston that she is a large female Great Horned Owl.

Stay tuned next Tuesday for the story of Tskili’s recent illness and how Simon was vital in his survival. If you’d like to help Houston Audubon’s conservation efforts, including taking care of our feathered friends like Tskili and Simon, please contribute for #GivingTuesday on or before Nov. 27th by clicking here.

The Beak of the Week on the Houston Audubon Facebook page featured the Red-tailed Hawk. It was posted by Bryce Loschen on November 16, 2018. Click the link to see the profile in our Bird Gallery.

Meet Tskili – one of the hardest working birds in environmental education. His name translates to Great Horned Owl in Cherokee.

If you’d like to help Houston Audubon’s conservation efforts, including taking care of our feathered friends like Tskili, please contribute for Giving Tuesday on or before Nov. 27th by clicking here.

If you have a student in your life who you want to serve the community, here are some tips for how to encourage teenagers to volunteer with a cause they care about.

The Beak of the Week on the Houston Audubon Facebook page featured the Wood Duck. It was posted by Lark Heston on November 9, 2018. Click the link to see the profile in our Bird Gallery.

Ray Bednar presented Fantastic Cranes and Where to Find Them at our Speaker Event on November 8, 2018, held at the United Way on Waugh Drive.

The Beak of the Week on the Houston Audubon Facebook page featured the Yellow-bellied Sapsucker. It was posted by Richard Gibbons on November 2, 2018. Click the link to see the profile in our Bird Gallery.

The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers has issued the COASTAL TEXAS PROTECTION AND RESTORATION FEASIBILITY STUDY: DRAFT INTEGRATED FEASIBILITY REPORT and ENVIRONMENTAL IMPACT STATEMENT (Coastal Texas Study DIFR-EIS). The Coastal Texas Study has been commonly referred to as the Coastal Spine or Ike Dike.

At Houston Audubon we believe every greenspace counts. Urban restoration projects can only transform so much of the city into usable habitat for wildlife. The Bird-Friendly Yard program aims to use other available urban landscape, specifically lawns, as wildlife habitat.

Here is a link to the November 2018 edition of our monthly E-News in case you missed it. You can subscribe by filling in the form at the bottom of any page on our website.

Meredith Segal is our new Development Director. She comes to Houston Audubon with over 15 years of experience working in not-for-profit development.

The Beak of the Week on the Houston Audubon Facebook page featured the Lesser Black-backed Gull. It was posted by Bryce Loschen on October 26, 2018. Click the link to see the profile in our Bird Gallery.

We are so pleased to announce that our Birds, Bugs & Blooms Gala on October 18, 2018, was a huge success! The sold-out event at The Briar Club had 325 people in attendance and raised $346,000. The evening started with a one-hour silent auction during which guests were also encouraged to “Meet the Birds.” Three of Houston Audubon’s Education Raptors, Juliet, Simon and Skeeter, were in attendance to meet and greet the guests. Guests mingled over drinks and hors d’oeuvres and there were some friendly bidding wars on the exciting auction items.

This video was premiered at the annual Gala held on Thursday, October 18, 2018 where the theme was Birds, Bugs and Blooms. The video is 5.5 minutes long and is both informative and enjoyable. Current programs and Gala honorees are highlighted.

Click here to view the video on YouTube.

Houston Audubon's Bird-friendly Communities program aims to transform the greater Houston area into a thriving community that supports and enjoys birds. See what BFC has accomplished and has in store for Houston.

How can you encourage the children in your life to be active and volunteer with their community? We have some ideas for how to get kids involved in giving back.

The Beak of the Week on the Houston Audubon Facebook page featured the Dunlin. It was posted by Lark Heston on October 19, 2018. Click the link to see the profile in our Bird Gallery.

Trey is the new Maintenance and Groundskeeper at Sims Bayou Urban Nature Center.

Houston Audubon recommends buildings three stories and higher to turn LIGHTS OUT tonight and tomorrow night (October 15th through October 17th). Conditions are favorable for intense bird migration headed south to the upper Texas coast. We recommend buildings three stories and above turn off unnecessary lighting during the Fall migration period, October 15 to November 30.

Beak of the Week: Killdeer
Beak of the Week: Killdeer

The Beak of the Week on the Houston Audubon Facebook page featured the Killdeer. It was posted by Maria Hart on October 12, 2018. Click the link to see the profile in our Bird Gallery.


Archived Articles

Each page in the Newsroom contains up to 50 articles. Older articles are archived in the pages below.

  • From the end of the current Newsroom thru August 31, 2018.

  • From April 30, 2018 thru August 28, 2018.

  • From January 9, 2018 thru April 28, 2018.

  • From August 10, 2017 thru January 7, 2018.

  • From November 17, 2016 thru August 8, 2017.

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